“Fantastic” folates and where to find them in Australian foods?

Tue 4 Apr 2017 4:00pm5:00pm
Registration: 
15 March 20174 April 2017

Venue

Room: 
Conference Room 103, 39 Kessels Rd, Coopers Plains, 4108

 

Honorary Professor Michael Rychlik from the Technical University of Munich will present a NSA and RACI seminar "“Fantastic” folates and where to find them in Australian foods?" at Forensic and Scientific Services, Coopers Plains on Tuesday 4 April 2017.

Folates are critical vitamins worldwide as the daily dietary intake often does not cover the recommended dose. This particularly applies to countries which do not fortify staple foods. However, mandatory fortification is still under discussion due to potential risks for some parts of the population. Therefore, there is an emerging search for natural folate sources. With its unique range of different climates, Australia offers the perspective for growing promising native foods as well as those originating from all over the world. For evaluating these sources, accurate methods for folate analysis and assessing their bioavailability are required. In this seminar, the use of stable isotopes to achieve this goal will be presented as well as recent results on promising folate sources from Australia and other parts of the world.

Professor Michael Rychlik

Michael Rychlik graduated in food chemistry at the University of Kaiserslautern in 1988. His PhD studies on the flavour of bread were completed in 1996 and he was appointed full professor at the TUM in 2010. In 2015 he served as a Visiting Professor at the University of Queensland (UQ), Australia and in 2016 he was appointed an Honorary Professor at the latter University. In 2016 he was also active as a Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore (NUS).
Prof. Michael Rychlik now is the Head of the Chair of Analytical Food Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich, Germany (TUM).

Register here.

For further information, please contact ashley.tronoff@health.qld.gov.au or m.netzel@uq.edu.au.

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