Queensland became one of the first jurisdictions in the world to regulate the collection, circulation and use of biological resources (e.g. plants, animals, fungi and micro-organisms) for scientific and commercial purposes when it passed the Biodiscovery Act in 2004. In order to bring this Queensland law into line with the Nagoya Protocol and other relevant international laws, to fulfil its commitment to recognise traditional knowledge, and to overcome some of the problems with the existing law, the Queensland Government made a number of amendments to the QLD Biodiscovery Act 2004 on 11 August 2020.

This workshop examines the key features of the new Queensland biodiscovery law and the impact it might have for researchers, scientists, plant breeders, and Indigenous Peoples.


Presenter profile 
Professor Brad Sherman

Professor Brad Sherman is an ARC Laureate Fellow at the University of Queensland, looking at intellectual property and its impact on food security. Professor Sherman's previous academic positions include posts at Griffith University, the London School of Economics, and the University of Cambridge. His research expertise encompasses many aspects of intellectual property law, with a particular emphasis on its historical, doctrinal, and conceptual development.

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About Science Seminars

Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation hosts science seminars across the disciplines of animal, horticulture, crop, food and nutritional sciences.

With a range of speakers from Australia and abroad, the series explores how high-impact science will significantly improve the competitiveness and sustainability of the tropical and sub-tropical food, fibre and agribusiness sectors.
 

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The Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation is a research institute at The University of Queensland supported by the Queensland Government via the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.