QAAFI Diversity and Inclusion Committee

QAAFI values the contribution of our staff and students from around the world, who undertake high impact science in tropical agriculture and food production. To support gender equity and diversity across QAAFI’s operations, we have established a Diversity and Inclusion Committee​.

Our aims

  • Develop and implement diversity and inclusion goals, strategies and targets with the aim of implementing best practice in QAAFI
  • Monitor the ongoing success of these initiatives and identify impediments to progress 
  • Provide a forum for broad discussion and consultation around diversity and inclusion at QAAFI
  • Contribute to the communication and reinforcement of shared values around diversity and inclusion to support a culture of inclusiveness at QAAFI
  • Raise awareness for issues pertaining to diversity and inclusion through seminars and other relevant events
  • Make recommendations to the QAAFI Management Team on issues relating to diversity and inclusion for staff and students at QAAFI
  • Work in partnership with other diversity and inclusion support groups across the University to share best practice, and ensure alignment with University-wide initiative

If you have any items that you would like addressed at a QAAFI Diversity and Inclusion Committee meeting, please contact qdic@uq.edu.au

 

The Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI) is showcasing incredible female scientists. Science and gender equality are both vital for the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Over the past 15 years, the global community has made a lot of effort in inspiring and engaging women and girls in science. UQ is actively working to lead the way, inspiring young women to become active in science and help build a better world.

QAAFI Diversity and Inclusion news

  • Queensland’s talented tech women and successful science professionals joined 385 friends, family and VIPs to celebrate the 2017 WiT Award finalists and winners at the gala awards dinner on Friday 1 September at the Royal International Convention Centre in Brisbane.
  • Cécile is studying sustainable grazing system intensification and is passionate about creating a healthier planet, but realises gender bias is still an obstacle for women in science. This passion has led Cécile to take part in a once-in-a-life-time experience, the Homeward Bound initiative, which involves an expedition to Antarctica.
  • Dr Yasmina Sultanbawa has been acknowledged for her 'Kakadu Plum - Fruitful collaboration puts indigenous industry on the world stage' project at the 2016 B/HERT Awards.
  • Researchers in UQ’s Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences have identified a new mechanism for how healthy cereals such as oats reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood stream, thereby lowering the risk of heart disease.
  • Dr Gabriele Netzel has won a prestigious early-career Advance Queensland Research Fellowship to help protect livestock against Birdsville Indigo, Indigofera linnaei, a native legume found widely in pastures across much of central and northern Australia.
  • Dr Alice Hayward has won a prestigious mid-career Advance Queensland Research Fellowship, to develop the world-first MICROpropagator – a non-GM, non-toxic, root-inducing formula to speed up the root production of woody crops such as avocados.
  • 2015 proved a successful year for QAAFI’s Dr Alice Hayward.

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